4 Reasons Why Your Dental Practice Isn’t Bringing in New Patients

Posted by HJT Design

Happy dentist in a new clinic that was just redesigned to increase patient referrals and retention.

It can be a frustrating experience if your dental office isn’t bringing in as many new patients through the door as you’d like to see. Before you may chalk it up to dips in the economy, or a number of other reasons, it might be time to take a hard look at your dental office design and evaluate some areas that could use some improvement or a little TLC.

Here are 4 reasons why new patients might not be flocking to your dental practice:

1. Your First Impression Falls Flat

There may be some instances where first impressions don’t count, but when it comes to dental practices, your first impression most definitely matters. If any area of your dental practice makes people want to run out the front door screaming, then that’s a big red flag that it’s in dire need of some upgrading.

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How to Fix It:

Pretend you’re a patient and look at your dental practice from an honest perspective. Which areas work well, and which ones need some improvement? You want your entire dental office to reflect a positive, upscale environment that has a good flow and energy that people will be eager to visit (yes, even if it’s the dentist).

2. Your Dental Practice Feels Unwelcome and Outdated

It’s no secret that many people dread visiting the dentist, so many patients are already on edge prior to even stepping foot into your practice. If your office is ugly and outdated, patients will be less than impressed. If your practice is too cold and sterile, patients will feel more anxious about upcoming procedures. No one wants to feel like they suddenly entered into a hospital or surgery ward.

How to Fix It:

Choose your design elements wisely, by making sure your color scheme, lighting, furniture, and décor are all on point and work well together.

3. Outdated Equipment and Technology

The competition is fierce these days, and if you’re not keeping up with the latest technology trends, many patients will notice. They will wonder why other dental practices are offering services yours isn’t.

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How to Fix It:

Consider investing and incorporating some new dental office equipment and technology into your dental practice. It will be well worth the investment. Your patients, and especially your staff will greatly appreciate the benefits.

4. Lack of Privacy or Space

If your dental practice lacks the proper space and privacy, patients likely won’t be returning, nor giving out referrals. This includes all areas of your dental practice from your waiting room, to reception desks, to your operatory rooms. The design and layout of your dental floor plan are two of the most important aspects of any dental office redesign project, and careful consideration should be taken during this step of the design process.

How to Fix It:

Choose an open, flexible dental office floor plan that can easily be reconfigured down the road. Remember, “less is more” when it comes to the number of items in your dental practice.

Choose the proper cabinetry and storage to keep clutter and unnecessary items off of countertops, floors, and in walkways.

High ceilings will make the rooms appear larger and more spacious. The more open the floor plan, the less claustrophobic and more relaxed patients will feel.

By making some improvements, whether big or small, you can ensure that your patients will have a positive and pleasant experience, greatly improving the odds of them returning to your dental practice, as well as referring your practice to their friends and family. If you’re ready to start the conversation about remodeling your dental practice, contact us today. We have the experience and know-how to take your plans from ideas to reality, and we have an architect on staff to round out our team of experts. We understand the unique needs of dentists, and we want to help you succeed. A new office might not be as far away as you think.

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